Frequently Asked Questions for Faculty and Staff

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Classes and Academics | Research | HR and Employment | University Travel | Events and Meetings | Health, Wellness and Prevention | University Planning


Classes and Academics — For Faculty and Instructors

  • How will classroom and instructional capacity be de-densified? (Added May 26)

    In order to mitigate risk in teaching environments, the reduction of student capacity in all scheduled teaching spaces will take place as follows:

    • Reduce student occupant capacities in all classrooms and limit large classroom occupancy to no more than 150 students.
    • In classrooms, maintain a safe distance between the instructor and the nearest student while teaching and provide a see-thru barrier between instructor and students.
    • Establish additional classroom protocols including entry/exit; sanitation/cleaning; potential staggered or extended start times for classes.
    • Provide additional barriers in instructional labs, where all students cannot face in the same direction.
    • Require additional personal hygiene measures on common contact points for the more interactive teaching environments.

    NOTE: All class participants (students and instructors) should be wearing face coverings/masks and should be encouraged to face the same direction as much as possible

  • How should I handle disruptive classroom behavior, such as failing to meet expectations outlined in the Protect Purdue Pledge? (Added June 22)

    Guidelines on managing disruptive classroom behavior are available from the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities

  • What resources are available to help faculty prepare to deliver classes remotely?

    Our Innovative Learning group has prepared a set of resources to assist faculty and staff in delivering their courses remotely, including finding alternative means of instruction for laboratory and clinical courses if required. Remote teaching resources page can be found here: https://www.purdue.edu/innovativelearning/teaching-remotely/

    A dedicated Teaching Remotely FAQ page is also available.

    ITaP also offers several resources for faculty.

  • How are intellectual property issues going to be handled regarding material posted online for classes?

    Materials developed for online instruction in response to the Covid-19 outbreak will not be reused or commercialized, notwithstanding the University’s Policy on Intellectual Property (I.A.1) and Standard S-19 related to Courseware and Online Modules.

  • How will accommodations for students with disabilities need to be adjusted for online and hybrid learning environments? (Updated June 1)

    Accommodations for students registered with the Disability Resource Center (DRC) will remain in effect; however, instructors may need to adapt or adjust accommodations for an online environment. Students should contact their Access Consultant in the Disability Resource Center if they have questions. Instructors should review students’ Course Accessibility Letters (CALs), which are shared with instructors electronically via myPurdue. Adjustments will depend on the course design, content, and forms of assessment.

    The DRCC staff is operating normal business hours (8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) to support both instructors and students. Individuals may contact the DRCC access consultant listed on a student’s CAL if they have questions about accommodations. General questions may be sent to drc@purdue.edu. More information about alternative delivery of DRCC services to students and instructors is available on the DRC’s website.

Classes and Academics | Research | HR and Employment | University Travel | Events and Meetings | Health, Wellness and Prevention | University Planning


Research FAQs

  • I have a question for Sponsored Program Services on available guidance concerning grants/contracts. Where can I find answers?

    This website is the best place to start for guidance from various agencies and associations.

  • I am a graduate student with a question about being on campus, enrollment, housing, examinations, my committee or graduation. Is there guidance? (Updated June 18)

    Answers to the most frequently asked questions from graduate students are available from the Graduate School.

  • How can researchers obtain COVID-19 specific supplies? (Updated June 25)

    Procurement Services is working with campus stakeholders and vendor partners to identify and obtain essential supplies required to meet enhanced COVID-19 safety measures (e.g., face masks, hand sanitizer, disinfecting wipes, ethanol, and gloves). These centrally procured supplies will be made available at no charge to researchers, departments and colleges.

    For research purposes, here are current methods to order essential COVID-19 supplies:

    • Level-1 disposable surgical face masks, hand sanitizer, and disinfectant wipes can be ordered using the COVID-19 Essential Supplies Order Form. Please note: there is a national shortage of disinfecting wipes and local supplies may be low. As a substitute for disinfecting wipes, you can use 70% ethanol and wipe down surfaces with paper towels. You will need to dilute the ethanol acquired from the Fisher storeroom (see below). Please follow manufacturer’s instructions.
    • Purple nitrile gloves, ethanol, alcohol, anti-fog spray and anti-fog wipes can be ordered from the Fisher storerooms. COVID-19 specific supplies ordered from the Fisher storerooms can be charged to the PIs department COVID-IO account. The COVID-IO account will be used to track expenses associated with COVID-19 specific safety measures that may be fully or partially reimbursed by future federal support.
    • Face shields can be acquired using the Face Shield Order Form. Once you complete the order form, you will receive instructions for pick-up.

    If essential COVID-19 supplies are not available through the Fisher storerooms, researchers may order supplies on their own and charge the cost to their department COVID-IO account. These costs will be reimbursed from central resources as funds become available.

    Other equipment and supplies required as part of normal operations should be purchased and cost allocated in the usual manner.

  • After traveling, do I need to self-quarantine for 14 days before returning to work in a research laboratory?

    Domestic travelers no longer need to quarantine before returning to work in a research laboratory.

    In accordance with CDC guidelines, those who choose to travel internationally — regardless of whether the travel is sponsored by the university — must stay home and monitor their health for 14 days before returning to campus and/or research laboratories. In addition, all students and employees returning from outside the US must self-quarantine for 14 days and watch for symptoms of COVID-19. Prior to returning to campus, contact the Center for Health Living at 765-494-2135 to obtain medical clearance to return to campus.

  • What are the procedures for cleaning research facilities if someone with COVID-like symptoms has been in the research space? (Added June 4)

    COVID-19 cleaning and disinfecting a lab or facility

    Protect Purdue Expectations – COVID-19

    • All members of the campus community are expected to monitor for symptoms prior to coming to campus or the lab.
    • All members of the campus community must stay home if they are sick. It is the supervisor or principal investigator’s role to ensure that this message is communicated often in order to inform all members of the work or lab group.
    • All members of the campus community are required to wear a face mask or higher level PPE as required in the lab.
    • All members of the campus community are expected to follow enhanced hygiene protocols, including washing hands or using hand sanitizer often.
    • If an individual is in the lab and exhibiting symptoms (fever, cough, shortness of breath) they must be sent home and advised to contact a medical professional for guidance.

    Lab Cleaning Guidance

    If an individual with COVID-19 symptoms has been in a lab or common area for a significant amount of time within the past 7 days, the following process is recommended:

    • Close off areas used by that individual.
      • The lab does not need to cease operations if impacted area(s) can be closed off.
    • Open outside doors and windows if possible, to increase air circulation in the area.
    • Wait 24 hours before you clean or disinfect. If 24 hours is not feasible, wait as long as possible.
    • Using disposable gloves, utilize products appropriate for your lab. Clean and disinfect all areas used by the person who is sick, such as lab tables, shared electronic equipment such as tablets, touch screens, keyboards, and controls.
      • Building Services will clean common areas.
    • Once the area has been appropriately disinfected, it can be opened for use.
      • Workers without close contact with the person who is sick may return to work immediately after disinfection.
      • Workers with close contact may return to work and should monitor for symptoms (fever, cough, shortness of breath etc.)
    • Continue routine cleaning and disinfection. This includes everyday practices normally used to maintain a healthy environment.

    Adapted from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/disinfecting-building-facility.html

Classes and Academics | Research | HR and Employment | University Travel | Events and Meetings | Health, Wellness and Prevention | University Planning


HR and Employment

  • I am a staff member. Do I have to come to work? (Updated June 29)

    Remote work is encouraged for faculty and staff wherever possible.

    We recognize that some jobs require a campus presence and for other jobs, at least some time must be spent on campus. Unit leaders will decide which jobs can be performed remotely and which require presence on campus – this is not an individual decision, but we are encouraging remote work wherever and whenever possible.

  • I am a Research Assistant or Teaching Assistant. Do I have to come to work? (Updated June 29)
  • Do I qualify for Emergency Paid Sick Leave or Public Health Emergency Leave as part of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act?

    You qualify for paid leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act if you are unable to work or telework for the following reasons (click to enlarge):

    More information on the Families First Coronavirus Response Act can be found here.

  • How do I apply for or request Emergency Leave or Emergency FMLA?

    Employees should follow instructions found here to request Emergency Leave or Emergency FMLA that is available beginning April 1, 2020.

  • Do employees need to provide documentation when requesting Emergency FMLA or Emergency Leave?

    Employees may be asked by HR benefits or HR business partners to provide documentation when requesting Emergency FMLA or Emergency Leave.

  • I’m feeling stressed or overwhelmed by the situation. What resources are available?

    We’re here to help. Available resources are listed here

  • Does Purdue have guidelines for employees or managers considering remote work? (Updated June 29)

    Yes, Purdue’s Flexible Work Arrangement guidelines provide employees and managers with tools and forms for assessing and implementing arrangements. Managers and departments should reach out to their HR Business Partners for further guidance and support.

  • Should I notify Human Resources that I or one of my direct reports called in sick or was sent home with symptoms of COVID-19? (Updated June 29)

    No, employees who are sent home sick or with symptoms of COVID-19 should contact the Protect Purdue Health Center at 765-496-INFO (4636) or 833-571-1043 (toll free).

  • Will my Purdue health plan cover medical expenses associated with treatment for COVID-19?

    Students on a Purdue Student Health Plan

    Yes. Domestic, international and graduate staff students on the university’s full-insurance Anthem health plan who need care as a result of COVID-19 will be covered. Anthem will also waive out-of-pocket expenses for the focused test used to diagnose COVID-19 for fully insured, Individual, Medicare, and Medicaid members. You can call the number on your ID card to confirm coverage. You will pay any other out-of-pocket expenses the plan requires, unless otherwise determined by state law or regulation.

    Faculty and Staff on a Purdue Health Plan

    Yes. All costs associated with COVID-19 testing and the office visit associated with the testing have been waived for benefit eligible faculty and staff and dependents on  the university’s self-insured health plan. Treatment for COVID-19 will have the same coverage that is currently available for any emergency or non-emergency illness, subject to the normal deductible, copay, or out-of-pocket amounts associated with your medical plan. For additional coverage details visit Purdue medical coverage webpage.

    PURA Retirees on a UHC Health Plan

    Yes. you will have the same coverage that is currently available for any emergency or non-emergency illness, subject to the normal deductible, copay, or out-of-pocket amounts associated with your medical plan. For additional coverage details call Customer Care at the number located on the back of their medical ID cards

  • Should a supervisor require an employee who is out sick (not due to COVID-19) to provide a health care provider’s note?

    No. Managers should actively encourage sick employees to stay home, but should not require employees who are sick to validate their illness. Health care provider offices and medical facilities may be extremely busy and not able to provide such documentation in a timely way.

  • May Purdue prohibit an employee from coming to work if the employee is known to have contracted COVID-19 themselves, or to have had close contact with someone who has? (Updated June 29)
    Yes. Purdue is obligated to provide a safe workplace and may take necessary and reasonable steps to minimize health risks for its employees, such as requiring that employees not come to work if they have or have been exposed to COVID-19. Employees in this situation should contact Protect Purdue Health Center 765-496-INFO (4636) or 833-571-1043 (toll free) for assessment and guidance on testing, treatment and returning to work.
  • Does the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) entitle an employee to take leave to avoid contracting COVID-19?

    No. The FMLA entitled employees to job-protected leave when they have a serious health condition or when they need leave to care for covered family members who have a serious health condition. Leave for the purpose of avoiding exposure to the COVID-19 is not protected under the FMLA.

    Please note: Telecommuting/remote work is encouraged for faculty and staff wherever possible. We recognize that some jobs require a campus presence and for other jobs, at least some time must be spent on campus.  Unit leaders will decide which jobs can be performed remotely and which require presence on campus – this is not an individual decision, but we are permitting telework/remote work wherever possible.

  • May I bring my child to work if their school or daycare is closed?

    Bringing a child to work is not recommended or advisable. In many work areas it is prohibited. Importantly, bringing children into the workplace places them into another environment that could jeopardize their health and safety.

    If you need to be at home to care for others, talk to your supervisor immediately about using your available paid time off benefits, making alternative work arrangements (e.g., telework, alternative hours, etc.) or using FMLA coverage, if eligible. Staff may choose to be absent without pay if paid time off options are exhausted.

    You may also qualify for Emergency Paid Sick Leave and/or Public Health Emergency Leave as part of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Please see the FAQs above for more information.

  • When can I return to work if I have been diagnosed with COVID-19? (May 19)
    Employees may return to work when the following three conditions are met:
    • It must be a minimum of 10 days since symptom onset and
    • 3 days fever free without medication and
    • respiratory improvement
    The employee must supply a return to work medical release from their medical provider to their supervisor.
  • Additional HR resources

    Additional information and resources from HR can be found here.

  • Employment and Working (Updated June 29)

    Who does this remote work guidance apply to?
    This guidance applies to all Purdue West Lafayette employees, including Purdue Extension and Polytechnic Statewide employees.

    Does the March 25, 2020 guidance change the general terms and conditions of my employment?
    No. The guidance does not alter your general rights and responsibilities. Staff who are employed at-will remain at-will employees. Those who are appointed for definite or continuous terms of employment by contract, remain so employed. All faculty and staff who are able to work are expected to do so to the reasonable expectations of their supervisor and follow university policies governing their work.

    My job is not a Critical On-Campus Support Function and I am unable to work remotely, what do I do?
    Employees who are not a Critical On-Campus Support functions and are not able to work remotely, may be assigned other duties. Employees should discuss with their manager about opportunities for other work, LinkedIn Learning, completing webcert, etc. If your manager is unable to assign work, you will be approved for Other Leave. Managers should reach out to the HR business partner for assistance prior to approving leave. You will need to request this time through Success Factors as you normally request time off by selecting ‘Other Leave with Pay’ from the drop down options. This will ensure all proper accounting of leave without any loss of existing leave accruals.

    Can I come into to the office?
    Only Critical On-Campus Support Functions should be working on campus. Members of the General Workforce should continue to Telework until and unless instructed otherwise by their supervisors.

    Can employees be asked to work outside their job classification or in another department?
    Yes, members of the General Workforce may be required to work outside of their normal unit as deemed necessary during this time. All employees are asked to remain available for work to the greatest extent possible.

    My manager assigned me to duties that are not my normal assignment. Am I required to perform these duties?
    Employees who are assigned duties, even if not a part of their normal assignment, and cannot perform those duties as assigned, must provide an acceptable reason why you cannot perform this work. The HR business partner in your area can facilitate the discussion. Employees will not be eligible for Other Leave if they unreasonably refuse additional duties assigned.

    Can my manager schedule me to work hours or shifts that I normally do not work?
    Yes, you may be asked to work more or different hours than normal. Managers will attempt to provide as much advanced notice of changes to regular work schedules as possible.

  • How will staff be paid beginning July 1, 2020? (Added June 29)

    Please use the Pay and Leave Table found here. (En Español)

  • Tracking Time and Leave (Updated June 29)

    How do I record my time beginning July 1, 2020?
    Please use the Pay and Leave Table found here. (En Español)

    What if I need time away from work for reasons unrelated to the availability of work or the COVID-19 outbreak?
    We understand that issues may arise requiring your attention that are not directly related to the COVID-19 outbreak. It is possible that you need time away from work to attend to other matters. During these times, you should still use your vacation, personal and sick leave time to attend to your personal needs. We trust that you will accurately record time consistent with this guidance.

    Please use the Pay and Leave Table found here (En Español) for guidance on taking leave.

  • Information for Supervisors (Updated June 29)

    I have an employee who is not performing duties as assigned, whether on campus or via remote work. What can I do?
    If the employee was aware of their duties assigned, but they did not perform, talk with them to find out why they didn’t complete duties as required. If they have a reasonable explanation, remind them of their responsibilities to appropriately complete duties or document time off. If their explanation is not reasonable given the situation, corrective action may be an option. Contact your HR business partner.

  • Do you have information about the pause in staff recruitment? (Updated May 5)

    I was ready to offer the position; what do I tell my candidate? I do not want to lose them.
    Talent Acquisition has developed messaging to assist in notifying candidates of the pause in hiring, while working to keep top candidates engaged. Please work directly with your talent acquisition specialist for assistance.

    I was ready to narrow to my final three; can I still hold phone interviews?
    No; at this time there is a pause on all hiring activity.

    Will I have to repost the position once the pause has been lifted?
    Current, open staff positions will continue to be posted on our Careers website. However, applicants will not be forwarded to hiring managers at this time, and no interviews — in-person, by telephone or virtual — should be scheduled.

    I just made the job offer to a candidate; what do I tell them now?
    All accepted offers will be honored; however, there may be a need to move the start date back later than originally planned.

    I believe this position is essential; whom do I contact to gain permission to continue hiring?
    There may be some cases where a hire is considered essential. Therefore, exceptions may be granted by a dean, vice provost or vice president — in consultation with the vice president for Human Resources — based on unit needs. If you believe you have a need for an exception, written justification should be submitted through your vice president or dean to Vice President for Human Resources, Bill Bell. Please copy your talent acquisition specialist on your request. Please note we expect exceptions to be rare.

    Can I offer and extend the start date ?
    At this time, there is a pause on all hiring activity. No offers may be extended during this time. There may be some cases where a hire is considered essential. Therefore, exceptions may be granted by a dean, vice provost or vice president — in consultation with the vice president for Human Resources — based on unit needs. For accepted offers, there may be a need to move the start date back later than originally planned.

    Does the hiring pause apply to student employees?
    Yes. The hiring pause applies to all positions, including student employees.

    How will new hires complete the I-9 process?
    Section 2 will be completed virtually for all new employees hired during the COVID-19 social distancing period. New hires working onsite or remotely should contact their local payroll center (West Lafayette campus) or their human resources department (Purdue Fort Wayne and Purdue Northwest campuses) to receive instructions on when and how to complete section 2.

    The Purdue West Lafayette payroll centers and Purdue Fort Wayne or Northwest human resources departments will assist new hires in completing I-9 section 2 virtually, instead of in person. They will use FileLocker, WebEx or Skype to review and receive the proper documentation. Once the new hire is able to return to campus, they must contact their payroll center or human resources department so the documentation can be physically inspected, as required by law. I-9 verifiers can review resources and further information online.

    Is New Employee Orientation still available as part of onboarding?
    New Employee Orientation (NEO) has transitioned to an online format. New hires already scheduled to attend an upcoming NEO will receive a new employee information packet, complete with links and detailed instructions to access the online orientation content. In the interim, hiring supervisors are asked to notify their new hires of this change. In addition, it will be important for new hires to continue to follow the steps listed in their welcome letter, as BoilerKey will be required to access online information. Updated information is available via the “New Employee Orientation / Resources” web page sections — Weekly Orientation Sessions, New Employee Orientation and New Hire Wizard and System Access.

    If NEO is online, will an employee registration be required?
    No, registration will not be required for the online new employee orientation.

    Whom do I contact if I need to delay a start date for an individual who has already accepted an offer?
    Notify your talent acquisition specialist. They will assist in updating the new employee’s hire date in the system.

Classes and Academics | Research | HR and Employment | University Travel | Events and Meetings | Health, Wellness and Prevention | University Planning


University Travel

  • What travel restrictions are in place at this time? (Updated June 29)

    The following travel restrictions are in place, effective June 29, 2020, for all Purdue University (WL) faculty, staff and students* who are traveling for work or in connection with a course, including Purdue Extension and Polytechnic Statewide: 

    1. No University-sponsored international travel, regardless of funding source, is permitted until the U.S. Department of State travel advisories and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance have lifted.
    2. All other University-sponsored travel should occur only if the travel can be conducted in full compliance with public health guidance issued by both the State of Indiana and the destination state at the time of travel. It is the traveler’s and approving department’s responsibility to ensure that the travel is fully compliant. 
    3. All University-sponsored travel is subject to fiscal approval:
      1. Externally funded travel will follow the approval process in place for the funding source (e.g., grant from which the funds are drawn to pay for the travel). 
      2. All travel expenditures must be reviewed to ensure consistency with the approved FY21 budget. 
      3. The following guidelines do not supersede or change the current travel policy. All faculty and staff must follow the University’s guidelines for booking and paying for travel expenses.
    4. Domestic air travel is permitted when such travel is necessary (e.g., when required for the conduct of research). Air travel must follow the guidance of any airline and airport used in connection with the travel. Travelers should maintain social distance in the airports and wear a face mask. The CDC provides additional consideration for safe travel here.
    5. Vehicular travel must be done in a manner that minimizes the possibility of COVID-19 transmission. The following guidelines must be followed: 
      1. Everyone in the vehicle must wear a face mask for the duration of the trip.
      2. Occupancy in the vehicle cannot exceed 50% total ridership based on the number of seats in a vehicle: 
        1. Passenger vehicle (including compact cars, SUVs, etc.) — i.e., if 5 seats, occupancy cannot exceed 2 people.
        2. Passenger van and high-capacity trucks — i.e., if 10 seats, occupancy cannot exceed 5 people.
        3. Shuttle bus — i.e., if 16 seats, occupancy cannot exceed 8 people.
      3. Occupants in the vehicle should maintain 6 feet of separation in the vehicle, if possible. This may be accomplished by facing the same direction, sitting in alternating rows in a vehicle or by maintaining a zig-zag pattern of seat spacing. 
      4. Hand sanitizer, wipes and tissues must be available in the vehicle for each trip.
      5. Circulate air within the vehicle at all times, as possible given weather conditions. Open or partially open windows and use outside air for air conditioning.
      6. Whenever possible, seek to minimize stops while traveling.
    6. The University recommends against personal international travel due to the State Department advisories and CDC guidance and strongly urges the entire campus community to exercise all due care for personal domestic travel. 

    *Student organization and other extracurricular student travel must be approved by the Office of Student Activities and Organizations.

  • Who does this travel guidance apply to? (Updated June 29)

    This guidance applies to all Purdue West Lafayette faculty staff and students who are traveling for work or in connection with a course, including Purdue Extension and Polytechnic Statewide: including Purdue Extension and Polytechnic Statewide employees.

  • What if I am planning international travel using grant funding? (Updated June 29)

    No University-sponsored international travel, regardless of funding source, is permitted until the U.S. Department of State travel advisories and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance have lifted.

  • Are there any restrictions or guidelines for personal travel? (Updated June 29)

    The University recommends against personal international travel due to the State Department advisories and CDC guidance and strongly urges the entire campus community to exercise all due care for personal domestic travel.

  • Should returning international travelers self-quarantine? (Updated June 29)

    In accordance with CDC guidelines, those who choose to travel internationally — regardless of whether the travel is sponsored by the university — must stay home and monitor their health for 14 days.

    In addition, all students and employees returning from outside the U.S. must self-quarantine for 14 days and watch for symptoms of COVID-19. Prior to returning to campus, contact the Protect Purdue Health Center at 765-496-INFO (4636) or 833-571-1043 (toll free) to obtain medical clearance to return to campus.

  • How do I self-quarantine? (Updated June 29)

    Anyone undergoing a self-quarantine should follow the CDC’s self-quarantine guidelines.

    For additional questions on monitoring your health, contact the Protect Purdue Health Center at 765-496-INFO (4636) or 833-571-1043 (toll free).

  • What should graduate staff and post docs do if they are working remotely in the US or in an overseas setting?

    Graduate staff and post docs working in a remote location within the US should follow CDC guidelines, keep in contact with their supervisor and remain in their current location or return to West Lafayette. Individuals who are overseas are advised to return to the U.S. as soon as possible. Delaying return at this time could result in being stranded abroad for an indefinite amount of time, not just weeks, but perhaps months in some cases.

    Purdue faculty, staff and students who are abroad and who are not U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent residents are advised to return to their homeland or to the U.S., depending on one’s unique circumstances and preferences.

    Supervisors and program directors are asked to notify those among their staff, faculty and students who are out of the United States of this new direction.

    U.S. citizens abroad should already be enrolled in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program through the US Department of State to:

    • Receive important information from the Embassy about safety conditions in your destination country, helping you make informed decisions about your travel plans.
    • Help the U.S. Embassy contact you in an emergency, whether natural disaster, civil unrest, or family emergency.
    • Help family and friends get in touch with you in an emergency.

    If not already enrolled in this program, all Purdue faculty, staff or students abroad should please enroll immediately.

    Non-U.S. citizens should seek similar guidance from their home government through appropriate channels.

    Questions or concerns should be directed to Mike Brzezinski, dean of international programs – mbrzezinski@purdue.edu

Classes and Academics | Research | HR and Employment | University Travel | Events and Meetings | Health, Wellness and Prevention | University Planning


Events and Meetings

  • What are the current university restrictions on events? (Updated May 18)

    The following restrictions for events are in place:

    1. No university-sponsored in-person events through July 31.
    2. For purposes of this guidance, an “event” includes but is not limited to in-person camps, conferences, public events and meetings, non-essential business and social gatherings, and sporting events.
    3. If a campus department or college sponsoring an event believes its event is essential and can be held in a manner that comports with best safety guidance, it may submit a written request to the appropriate Dean, Vice President, Vice Provost, etc. to hold the event that provides a complete description of the event, why it is essential and how safety precautions will be implemented.
    4. For purposes of determining whether the event is essential, the university will consider whether:
      • There is a compelling university interest in the event. Compelling interest must be measured by the university as a whole and not with reference to any individual, department or narrow college interest. In this context, compelling evokes the highest university strategic interests.
      • The event is necessary to fulfill the compelling university interest. In other words, there are no alternatives to in-person attendance, the event cannot be postponed, and the compelling interest can only be served by personal attendance.
    5. Any unit requesting a waiver must demonstrate that the event:
      • Has adequate hygiene supplies including sinks with soap, hand sanitizers, tissues, and disposable facemasks (for persons who start having symptoms).
      • Has a plan for safe and persistent cleaning and disinfection of all surfaces and areas utilized by the event.
      • Has ample signage reminding attendees of safety precautions and individual prevention strategies.
      • Has adequate space for attendees to reasonably distance themselves from each other (CDC guidance provides that a reasonable social distancing radius is approximately six feet). Is held in the open or in suitably ventilated spaces.
      • Has a designated space for staff and attendees who may become sick and cannot immediately leave the event.
      • Has a written plan for transportation to a hospital or other medical facility.

    Please note that these guidelines are subject to change as the COVID-19 situation continues to evolve.  All requests should be funneled to the appropriate dean, vice provost or vice president via their respective leadership teams and management structures.

  • What are the current university restrictions on routine internal meetings (e.g., staff meetings)?

    Unit heads and managers are responsible for scheduling regular meetings that are traditionally integrated into the unit’s operations. For example, it is common for periodic staff meetings and “all faculty and staff” meetings to occur. Some of these meetings can include a sizeable number of attendees. For the period beginning March 23, 2020 through June 30, 2020, we urge unit leaders to consider the following factors in determining whether to hold scheduled operational meetings: 

    1. Use common sense.
    2. Is the meeting essential to your unit’s operations?
    3. Can it be postponed?
    4. Is there an alternative means to share information/can you conduct the meeting using digital technology such as Webex, or is an in-person meeting the only viable mechanism?
    5. Does the meeting location permit attendees to reasonably distance themselves from each other (CDC guidance provides that a reasonable social distancing radius is approximately six feet)?

    Please note that these guidelines are subject to change as the COVID-19 situation continues to evolve.  All requests should be funneled to the appropriate dean, vice provost or vice president via their respective leadership teams and management structures.

    Guidance for making internal meeting decisions (click to enlarge):

    Purdue Meeting Decision Tree

  • What is the guidance for anyone planning to host an international visitor or a conference, seminar or other event with international visitors?

    All university-sponsored events involving external visitors are canceled through June 30.

    Further, in addition to the suspension of all campus events with 50 or more people, at the direction of the president and provost, the university will not extend invitations to or host visitors from countries with CDC travel advisories at level 2 or above due to coronavirus. This applies to the Purdue West Lafayette, Purdue Fort Wayne, Purdue Northwest and all Purdue Research Park locations. 

    Our department has planned a seminar, speaker, conference or other event that will be taking place at Purdue. Will international travelers be able to attend from countries the CDC has listed as level 2 and level 3 risks for coronavirus? If not, can we reimburse them for their lost travel?

    Travelers coming from countries the CDC has listed as level 2 and level 3 risks for coronavirus will not be permitted to attend. You will be able to reimburse them for their travel if Purdue was funding the travel initially for the program.

    If paid for on a personal card, an attempt should be made to request refunds, transfer tickets or otherwise minimize financial impact. All remaining expenses should be submitted using standard reimbursement processes.

    If paid for on a grant, and you cannot receive a refund or a credit, this expense will need to be moved off of the grant or approval needs to be requested from the funding agency. We recommend that you work with your Post Award Office administrator in Sponsored Program Services to see what alternatives are available for revising or extending the grant to allow travel in the future.

    Our department has a seminar, speaker, conference or other event that will be taking place at Purdue in the next month. Can we cancel the conference and be reimbursed for payments made to external entities?

    An attempt should be made to request refunds, transfer tickets or otherwise minimize financial impact. All remaining expenses should be submitted using standard reimbursement processes.

    If paid for on a grant, and you cannot receive a refund or a credit this expense will need to be moved off of the grantor approval needs to be requested from the funding agency. We recommend that you work with your Post Award Office administrator in Sponsored Program Services to see what alternatives are available for revising or extending the grant to allow travel in the future.

  • Will conferences and events occur this summer? (Updated May 18)
    • All May, June and July conferences and events on campus are canceled.
    • Athletics will continue to follow campus, NCAA and Big Ten guidance.

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Health, Wellness and Prevention

  • When must I wear a face mask? How will this requirement be enforced? (Added June 12)

    On May 26, 2020, the Purdue University Board of Trustees ratified a university regulation requiring wearing a face mask upon entering a campus building. The science on facial coverings has become clear in terms of limiting spread of COVID-19. Face masks help protect others from unintentional exposure from the person wearing it. Each of us has an obligation to protect against the spread of COVID-19.

    Compliance is expected in support of the Protect Purdue Pledge. As with other university regulations, failure to comply may result in disciplinary action through the Office of the Provost (faculty), Human Resources (staff) and the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities (students).

    Questions regarding exceptions to the regulation may be directed to those offices, which will then consult with other appropriate university offices/officials as necessary when evaluating requests for an exemption.

    Face masks do NOT replace personal protective equipment. If personal protective equipment is required, the appropriate personal protective equipment must continue to be worn as identified by the hazard assessment.

    If you are alone in your office or your lab, the regulation does not require you to wear a facial covering unless someone enters the space.

    You must wear a face mask if:

    • You are in a public or common space (hallways, conference rooms, restrooms, etc.) of any Purdue building.
    • You are in a classroom, laboratory or office with others.
    • You are outdoors and not able to maintain a safe social distance.

    You may remove your face mask if:

    • You are outdoors and able to maintain a safe social distance from others.
    • You are alone in your office or laboratory space.
  • I am a faculty or staff member who is particularly vulnerable to serious illness from COVID-19. What accommodations are available? (Added June 8)

    The Protect Purdue Implementation Team has announced the plan for identifying those who are most vulnerable to serious illness and the process for making accommodations to provide a safe working environment.

    More information is available here.

  • I live with someone who is medically vulnerable to serious illness. What should I do to help protect them? (Added June 17)

    The CDC recommends several practical things that you can do to protect vulnerable family members from your own work activities. These practices include the basics associated with practicing good social distance practices, wearing a face mask, frequent hand-washing, and avoiding public transportation. These and other practices can be found on the following CDC website: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/living-in-close-quarters.html.

  • I am concerned about working on campus because I live with someone who has a medical condition that puts them into a high-risk vulnerability category. What should I do? (Updated June 22)

    If any part of your work must be performed on campus and you have a family member living with you who is vulnerable to a serious illness, we encourage you to review this guidance and contact Human Resources to discuss ways to further protect yourself, including additional steps you can do at home to protect your family member.

    For additional information, check out the CDC website for additional considerations, including: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/deciding-to-go-out.html.

  • What should I do if I think I’ve been exposed to COVID-19? (Updated June 29)

    You can contact the Protect Purdue Health Center (PPHC) at 765-496-INFO (4636) or 833-571-1043 (toll free) to speak with a nurse who will ask questions and guide you through a COVID-19 screening to help determine if you have potentially been exposed and what your next plan of action needs to be, such as resuming normal stay-at-home activity/work, self-quarantining or seeking in-person health care.

    If you are advised to quarantine or seek additional health care, you will be provided a doctor’s note from the PPHC, which outlines your care and the number of days required to quarantine, etc.

  • How will campus be cleaned? (Updated June 10)
    • Building Services will perform expanded disinfection operations.
      • Touch point disinfection of campus 5x/week
      • Wide area disinfection of classrooms 5x/week
      • A day-time disinfection of high traffic restrooms in addition to the evening/night shift disinfecting to total 10x/week.
    • Priorities for Building Services staff will be as follows:
    1. Public safety/infrastructure protection (e.g. response to leaks and floods, snow removal at building entrances, etc.)
    2. Disinfecting critical areas
      1. Restrooms
      2. Common area high touch points (e.g. door handles)
      3. Classrooms
    3. Cleaning restrooms
    4. Cleaning classrooms
    5. Cleaning entrances and elevators
    6. Cleaning hallways and stairwells
    7. Cleaning offices, instructional laboratories and/or computer laboratories and conference areas
  • Will Purdue have the capability to test for COVID-19 on campus? (Added June 12)

    Yes. As part of our preparations for the fall semester, Purdue will establish a comprehensive internal testing and contact tracing system to rapidly assess, sample and test any student, faculty or staff member reporting COVID-19 symptoms and those identified through clinically relevant contact tracing. Testing protocols will be established in conjunction with CDC and ISDH guidelines.

    Building on existing testing capabilities at the Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab (ADDL) in the College of Veterinary Medicine, which has been CLIA certified to test human diseases, our protocols will include testing symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals following CDC guidelines with the goals of:

    • Protecting the most vulnerable.
    • Caring for symptomatic and sick individuals.
    • Managing the spread of the virus.

    Testing protocols may include the proactive testing of roommates, screening of our athletic teams, closely monitoring selected sites and surveillance testing throughout the semester.

    Additionally, we will build a mechanism for actively and accurately tracing the contacts of those who test positive for the virus, through a combination of in-person interviews and technology.

    Furthermore, Purdue will determine the most appropriate utilization of antibody (a/B) testing and its potential implementation on our campus.

  • What are the symptoms of COVID-19? (Updated April 28)

    The CDC provides a list of symptoms here. In confirmed COVID-19 cases, reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death. 

    According to the CDC, older adults and those with chronic medical conditions are at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19.

    You may also be interested in this COVID-19 self-checker from the CDC.

  • What if I test positive for COVID-19?

    All positive tests are reported to the CDC by the Department of Health or the laboratory processing the test. If you test positive for COVID-19, the County Health Department will trace your contacts and reach out as needed. Their tracing includes asking about the type of contact, the length of contact to assess risk level for the contact. To protect your personal health information, please do not email or call, or post on social media your test results.

  • Will Purdue implement contact tracing for those who test positive for COVID-19? (Added June 12)

    Yes. In tandem with our comprehensive onsite campus COVID-19 testing plan, Purdue will establish a mechanism for actively and accurately tracing the contacts of any faculty, staff or student who tests positive for the virus, through a combination of in-person interviews and technology.

    Read more about Purdue’s plans for a safe return to campus activity here.

  • When can I return to work if I have been diagnosed with COVID-19? (Added May 19)

    Employees may return to work when the following three conditions are met:

    • It must be a minimum of 10 days since symptom onset and
    • 3 days fever free without medication and
    • respiratory improvement

    The employee must supply a return to work medical release from their medical provider to their supervisor.

  • What is the CDC’s current recommendation on well individuals wearing cloth masks?

    The CDC says: We now know from recent studies that a significant portion of individuals with coronavirus lack symptoms (“asymptomatic”) and that even those who eventually develop symptoms (“pre-symptomatic”) can transmit the virus to others before showing symptoms. This means that the virus can spread between people interacting in close proximity—for example, speaking, coughing, or sneezing—even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms, and that is why social distancing of 6 feet apart is so important. In light of this new evidence, CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies) especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

    The CDC offers guidance on making and wearing cloth masks on these websites:

    These masks are not designed to function as OSHA approved personal protective equipment; rather they are an added deterrent to the spread of COVID19. Cloth masks do not replace the need to social distance and stay home if you are sick.

    If your duties require the wearing of personal protective equipment, you should continue to do so.

    Employees are permitted to provide their own cloth masks and wear them at work, as long as they follow the CDC recommendation for making, wearing and cleaning the cloth mask.

    The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators. Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

  • Should returning international travelers self-quarantine? (Updated June 29)

    In accordance with CDC guidelines, those who choose to travel internationally — regardless of whether the travel is sponsored by the university — must stay home and monitor their health for 14 days.

    In addition, all students and employees returning from outside the U.S. must self-quarantine for 14 days and watch for symptoms of COVID-19. Prior to returning to campus, contact the Protect Purdue Health Center at 765-496-INFO (4636) or 833-571-1043 (toll free) to obtain medical clearance to return to campus.

  • How do I self-quarantine? (Updated June 29)

    Anyone undergoing a self-quarantine should follow the CDC’s self-quarantine guidelines.

    For additional questions on monitoring your health, contact the Protect Purdue Health Center at 765-496-INFO (4636) or 833-571-1043 (toll free).

  • Does Purdue have a plan in place in the event of a campus or community outbreak of COVID-19? (Added June 12)

    Yes. The Protect Purdue Implementation Team is developing a range of contingency
    plans based on situations and circumstances that might occur and that may require the University to pause or shut down some or all activities.

    To prepare for this scenario, however likely or unlikely, Purdue is taking into careful consideration surrounding healthcare and treatment capabilities, on-campus testing capacities and back-up providers, and available isolation and quarantine capabilities on and around campus.

    Contingency planning is also taking into account what is happening in the surrounding community, and federal and state guidelines.

    Existing efforts, such as building resilient pedagogies that can adapt if a student must be isolated following a positive virus test, support our contingency planning.

    Read more about Purdue’s plan for a safe return to campus activity here.

  • I am having difficulty coping with the stress and uncertainty of changes brought about by COVID-19. What can I do? (Added June 22)

    Faculty and staff may seek confidential and professional mental health resources through Center for Healthy Living’s Employee Assistance Program

  • Why is the university requiring the flu vaccination? (Added May 27)

    Requirement of the influenza vaccine is among many substantial changes approved by Purdue’s Board of Trustees so that we can open our campus while protecting those most vulnerable in our community. Being vaccinated against seasonal flu helps the community avoid the risk of a seasonal flu pandemic and alleviates stress on the local and campus health systems while they are addressing the COVID-19 pandemic.

    As with current policy, we will allow exemptions for medical and religious purposes for the influenza vaccine. However, we expect all who intend to be part of the Purdue community to do their part and participate in this vital effort. The essential element that will allow us to continue to operate Purdue University will be the personal commitment from each member of the community to protect each other and themselves.

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University Planning

  • What measures is Purdue taking in preparation for a safe return to campus activity? (Added June 12)

    The Protect Purdue Plan is the University’s comprehensive and evolving plan to keep our campus and our community healthy and safe by limiting the spread of COVID-19.

    Read the details of the Protect Purdue Plan here.

  • Who is making decisions on campus safety and health issues? (Updated May 7)

    When a public health emergency emerges, the Public Health Emergency Planning team provides planning and response as needed. The group is co-chaired by the director, PUSH and the senior director, Environmental Health and Public Safety, and includes members of various campus departments as well as the Tippecanoe County Health Department.

    The university’s Integrated Emergency Management Plan guides preparedness for a number of specific emergencies, and includes guidance for public health emergencies.

    We look to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. State Department for recommendations and travel advisories.

  • What is the current CDC guidance for universities?

    This page offers guidance for institutes of higher education regarding administration, cleaning and travel.

  • How do I connect to the Purdue VPN from off-campus?
    Instructions for connecting to the Purdue VPN can be viewed here: https://www.itap.purdue.edu/connections/vpn/
  • What are the guidelines for designating and assigning “essential personnel”?

    In the event of a public health emergency or other crisis that requires access to the University to be severely limited, there are certain people who must report to campus to perform duties vital to the continuity of the University.  Additionally, there will be other essential staff performing critical functions who can perform these duties from a remote location such as home.

    Essential functions are those that need to be fulfilled when normal University operations have been suspended or closed. Departments must evaluate their department’s impact on the overall goal of maintaining essential University operations. Additionally, for continuity, they must designate these essential functions in advance. Pre-designation is especially important in incidents that happen with little notice. Individuals who directly support these functions are expected to report for work during the emergency period as requested by their department unless specifically directed by the department not to do so. The following information provides some general guidelines to be considered when designating the essential function positions.

    Essential/Critical functions or responsibilities are activities:

    • to preserve the health, well-being and safety of the Purdue campus community,
    • to assist and support students and others who must remain on campus with needs generated by the emergency,
    • to ensure timely and effective communication before, during, and after the emergency,
    • to provide utilities to maintain and protect campus buildings,
    • to maintain the health and well-being of animals,
    • to preserve the campus cyber infrastructure,
    • to preserve the core functions of the university (i.e. payroll, benefits, finance); and
    • to protect assets required to allow the University to resume its normal functions when the emergency /public health emergency has subsided; and
    • to preserve university facilities, including essential maintenance and repair

    These assets may include, but are not limited to:

    • cultures of valuable, unique, or irreplaceable living species,
    • valuable, unique, or irreplaceable research specimens or samples,
    • the environment surrounding and sustaining sensitive materials,
    • facilities and equipment,
    • sensitive or irreplaceable data, or
    • critical business continuation functions.

    Personnel designated by a unit head as “essential personnel” are employees who are needed in order to provide the minimum level of service in the department (i.e., human resources, finance, emergency services, utilities and provision of food and housing) and those needed to prevent irreparable damage to research and mechanical systems and those needed to maintain core functions of the university. Each affected unit head will designate Essential Personnel in his or her college or unit and notify them of their role and responsibility.

    Examples of staff members who are expected to be defined as critical or essential:

     

    Employee

    Duties

    Police officers and fire fighters

    Respond to emergencies, maintain order

    Certain power plant and utilities staff

    Maintain utilities

    Certain operations and maintenance staff

    Monitor facilities, repair serious problems

    Certain grounds staff

    Refuse removal, assist in equipment supply

    Certain computer staff

    Maintain infrastructure, support emergency operations

    Certain building services staff

    Refuse removal, cleaning of occupied areas

    Certain senior university staff

    Make decisions

    Certain business office staff

    Process emergency payments and payroll

    Certain human resources staff

    Process payroll, benefits, employee relations

    Certain animal caretakers

    Feed and monitor animals

    Certain health care staff

    Triage, treat students and staff, dispense medication

    Certain housing and food staff

    Feed and house students, staff

    Certain veterinary medicine staff

    Care of injured/sick animals

    Certain ADDL staff

    Provide diagnostic services

    Certain communications staff

    Disseminate information, policies

    Certain student services staff

    Assist students remaining on campus; continue recruitment, admissions processes

    The above list is by no means exhaustive but illustrates types of personnel considered as essential to report to campus or provide support from a remote location.  While the examples above illustrate the type of staff that are expected to be designated as essential, it will be a departmental decision to determine these in advance or as we progress into the crisis. 

    Additionally, essential staff may change depending on factors such as the time during the year, severity of the public health emergency, and the length of time suspension of classes or normal operations is in force.  The number of essential support staff, such as building services personnel will be highly dependent on the number of other students and staff who are on campus.  

    Prior to or at the declaration of a public health emergency period, Executive Vice Presidents, Vice Presidents, Vice Provosts, Deans, Directors, and Department Heads should review the designation of essential staff and the expectations for all employees during this period. 

  • Does the guidance on this site apply to the regional campuses (PNW and PFW)?
    Unless otherwise noted, the guidance on this page applies only to the Purdue West Lafayette campus. Regional campus leadership will provide guidance and answers specific to their campus communities. 

    This page provides guidance for Purdue Northwest. 

    This page provides guidance for Purdue Fort Wayne.  

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