The next giant leap in protecting Purdue: COVID-19 Vaccines

Three safe and highly effective COVID-19 vaccines are now available in the United States. All Boilermakers, especially the most vulnerable, are strongly encouraged to receive the vaccine as soon as they are eligible as part of their continued commitment to protect themselves, protect others and protect Purdue.

Who is currently eligible

The Indiana Department of Health determines who is eligible to receive the vaccine, and continues to update that guidance on the state’s COVID-19 website. The University does not determine who is eligible to receive the vaccine and has no immediate control over the distribution timeline.

The following groups of individuals across the state are currently eligible:

  • First responders (fire, law enforcement, emergency medical services, reservists and volunteers) who have in-person contact with the public.
  • Licensed and unlicensed health care workers who have in-person contact with patients or infectious material in any health care setting.
  • Individuals who are 60 years of age or older (as of Feb. 23).

If you reside outside of Indiana, please refer to your state or county’s health department.

How to schedule a vaccination appointment

Visit https://vaccine.coronavirus.in.gov/ or call 211 to find vaccine clinics and make appointment for yourself or on behalf of an eligible senior. There is no cost to receive the vaccine.

“When people have the opportunity to get the vaccine, they should do so. The vaccine is not going to cause COVID-19. It is not going to change your genetic makeup. It’s as safe as they come and right now it’s our only protection.”

Richard Kuhn, Krenicki Family Director of the Purdue Institute of Inflammation, Immunology and Infectious Disease and member of the Purdue vaccine allocation task force

Purdue prepares to serve as vaccine distribution site

Purdue is preparing to be a vaccine distribution site and do our part to move Tippecanoe County toward immunity as soon as the Indiana State Department of Health gives its approval and makes a supply of vaccine available.

To protect our campus “bubble,” the vaccines distributed on campus will only be available to the Purdue community: students, faculty, staff, and the dependents and spouses of our employees. The vaccine will be available at no cost.

In the meantime, those who are eligible to receive the vaccine — especially those who are most vulnerable — are strongly encouraged to get vaccinated now. Visit https://vaccine.coronavirus.in.gov/ or call 211 to find vaccine clinics and make appointment for yourself or on behalf of an eligible senior.

Purdue COVID-19 vaccine allocation task force

A team of scientists, medical experts and campus leaders was assembled in October 2020 and has been working in conjunction with the Protect Purdue Implementation Team to:

  • Determine and recommend Purdue’s response to the CDC’s and the state of Indiana’s phased and evolving approach to COVID-19 vaccination.
  • Gather and provide valuable information on available vaccines, including safety and efficacy.
  • Serve as a trusted body for the campus community, build confidence in vaccination and help dispel misinformation.

Task force members:

  • Willie M. Reed, task force chair and dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine.
  • R. Ethan Braden, senior vice president of marketing and communications.
  • Jen Hodges, executive vice president of operations, One to One Health.
  • Harm HogenEsch, professor of immunopathology and associate dean for research, College of Veterinary Medicine.
  • Richard Kuhn, Krenicki Family Director of the Purdue Institute of Inflammation, Immunology and Infectious Disease.
  • Richard D. Mattes, Distinguished Professor of Nutrition Science, head of the Department of Public Health and director of the Ingestive Behavior Research Center.
  • Nicole Noel, director of Purdue University Pharmacy.
  • Candace Shaffer, senior director of benefits in Human Resources.
  • Lisa Smith, medical director, One to One Health.
  • Scott Stienecker, medical director for infection prevention and co-director for antimicrobial stewardship, Parkview Regional Medical Hospital and Affiliates.
  • Gail Walenga, director, Purdue University Student Health Center.

“As a scientist and someone who genuinely cares about the Boilermaker community, I encourage everyone to receive the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as they are able. It is safe, it is effective, it is the right thing to do to protect yourself, protect others and protect Purdue.”

Willie M. Reed, Purdue vaccine allocation task force chair and dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine

What our experts are saying

Professor Richard Kuhn
discusses the vaccine’s effectiveness against new strains of COVID-19

Read more from Professor Kuhn on the COVID-19 vaccines.

Where to go for more information

Additional information is also available from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Indiana Department of Health.

What Boilermakers Are Asking

Both vaccine distribution and eligibility are determined by the Indiana Department of Health; Purdue does not have the ability to accelerate the vaccination of our faculty, staff or students.

Purdue strongly encourages all Boilermakers to receive the vaccine as soon as they are eligible. Similar to flu shots in the fall, the University may ask students and employees to document whether they have received the vaccine or if they are declining to do so for medical or religious reasons. If so, details will be shared with the campus community as soon as they are available.

Yes. As with virtually all vaccines, such as the annual influenza vaccine, there is a small chance you could contract and spread COVID-19 to others after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. For this reason, all Boilermakers are asked to continue to follow the Protect Purdue Pledge, including wearing a face mask correctly and consistently, avoiding large gatherings and practicing social distancing.

Yes. Although the COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective, there is a small chance you could contract COVID-19 after being vaccinated. As such, all will be required to participate in ongoing surveillance testing as requested, including those who have received the vaccine. 

No. None of the COVID-19 vaccines available in the U.S. contain the live virus that causes COVID-19, so a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

After the COVID-19 vaccination, you may experience some side effects, which may feel like the flu and might even affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days. Learn more about what side effects to expect.

Yes. It’s important to note that, while these vaccines are highly effective, there is still the chance that if you are exposed to the virus you could contract COVID-19 after having received the vaccination. On a campus of 50,000 people, 95% efficacy still translates to 2,500 individuals being vulnerable to the disease. For these reasons, all Boilermakers will continue to follow the Protect Purdue Pledge, including wearing a face mask correctly and consistently, avoiding large gatherings and practicing social distancing.

Load More

Still have questions? Call the Protect Purdue Health Center 24/7 at 765-496-INFO (4636) or toll free 1-833-571-1043, or email pphc@121.health.