Frequently Asked Questions for Campus Visitors

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Visitors | Events and meetings | University Planning | Health, Wellness and Prevention


Visitors

  • Is the university suspending any visitors at this time?

    Yes. In general, our ability to receive visitors is extremely limited.

    Effective immediately, at the direction of the president and provost, the university will not extend invitations to or host visitors from countries with CDC travel advisories at level 2 or above due to coronavirus. This applies to the Purdue West Lafayette, Purdue Fort Wayne, Purdue Northwest and all Purdue Research Park locations. 

    Faculty, staff or others who were expecting to host campus visitors from these countries may wish to check in with Michael Brzezinski, dean of international programs, at mbrzezinski@purdue.edu.

  • What is the guidance for anyone planning to host an international visitor or a conference, seminar or other event with international visitors? (Updated May 7)

    All university-sponsored events involving external visitors are canceled through July 31.

    Further, in addition to the suspension on any events on campus of 50 or more people, at the direction of the president and provost, the university will not extend invitations to or host visitors from countries with CDC travel advisories at level 2 or above due to coronavirus. This applies to the Purdue West Lafayette, Purdue Fort Wayne, Purdue Northwest and all Purdue Research Park locations.

    Our department has planned a seminar, speaker, conference or other event that will be taking place at Purdue. Will international travelers be able to attend from countries the CDC has listed as level 2 and level 3 risks for coronavirus? If not, can we reimburse them for their lost travel?

    Travelers coming from countries the CDC has listed as level 2 and level 3 risks for coronavirus will not be permitted to attend. You will be able to reimburse them for their travel if Purdue was funding the travel initially for the program.

    If paid for on a personal card, an attempt should be made to request refunds, transfer tickets or otherwise minimize financial impact. All remaining expenses should be submitted using standard reimbursement processes.

    If paid for on a grant, and you cannot receive a refund or a credit, this expense will need to be moved off of the grant or approval needs to be requested from the funding agency. We recommend that you work with your Post Award Office administrator in Sponsored Program Services to see what alternatives are available for revising or extending the grant to allow travel in the future.

    Our department has a seminar, speaker, conference or other event that will be taking place at Purdue in the next month. Can we cancel the conference and be reimbursed for payments made to external entities?

    An attempt should be made to request refunds, transfer tickets or otherwise minimize financial impact. All remaining expenses should be submitted using standard reimbursement processes.

    If paid for on a grant, and you cannot receive a refund or a credit this expense will need to be moved off of the grantor approval needs to be requested from the funding agency. We recommend that you work with your Post Award Office administrator in Sponsored Program Services to see what alternatives are available for revising or extending the grant to allow travel in the future.

Visitors | Events and meetings | University Planning | Health, Wellness and Prevention


Events and meetings

  • What are the current university restrictions on events? (Updated May 18)

    The following restrictions for events are in place:

    1. No university-sponsored in-person events through July 31.
    2. For purposes of this guidance, an “event” includes but is not limited to in-person camps, conferences, public events and meetings, non-essential business and social gatherings, and sporting events.
    3. If a campus department or college sponsoring an event believes its event is essential and can be held in a manner that comports with best safety guidance, it may submit a written request to the appropriate Dean, Vice President, Vice Provost, etc. to hold the event that provides a complete description of the event, why it is essential and how safety precautions will be implemented.
    4. For purposes of determining whether the event is essential, the university will consider whether:
      • There is a compelling university interest in the event. Compelling interest must be measured by the university as a whole and not with reference to any individual, department or narrow college interest. In this context, compelling evokes the highest university strategic interests.
      • The event is necessary to fulfill the compelling university interest. In other words, there are no alternatives to in-person attendance, the event cannot be postponed, and the compelling interest can only be served by personal attendance.
    5. Any unit requesting a waiver must demonstrate that the event:
      • Has adequate hygiene supplies including sinks with soap, hand sanitizers, tissues, and disposable facemasks (for persons who start having symptoms).
      • Has a plan for safe and persistent cleaning and disinfection of all surfaces and areas utilized by the event.
      • Has ample signage reminding attendees of safety precautions and individual prevention strategies.
      • Has adequate space for attendees to reasonably distance themselves from each other (CDC guidance provides that a reasonable social distancing radius is approximately six feet). Is held in the open or in suitably ventilated spaces.
      • Has a designated space for staff and attendees who may become sick and cannot immediately leave the event.
      • Has a written plan for transportation to a hospital or other medical facility.

    Please note that these guidelines are subject to change as the COVID-19 situation continues to evolve.  All requests should be funneled to the appropriate dean, vice provost or vice president via their respective leadership teams and management structures.

  • What are the current university restrictions on routine internal meetings (e.g., staff meetings)?

    Unit heads and managers are responsible for scheduling regular meetings that are traditionally integrated into the unit’s operations. For example, it is common for periodic staff meetings and “all faculty and staff” meetings to occur. Some of these meetings can include a sizeable number of attendees. For the period beginning March 23, 2020 through June 30, 2020, we urge unit leaders to consider the following factors in determining whether to hold scheduled operational meetings: 

    1. Use common sense.
    2. Is the meeting essential to your unit’s operations?
    3. Can it be postponed?
    4. Is there an alternative means to share information/can you conduct the meeting using digital technology such as Webex, or is an in-person meeting the only viable mechanism?
    5. Does the meeting location permit attendees to reasonably distance themselves from each other (CDC guidance provides that a reasonable social distancing radius is approximately six feet)?

    Please note that these guidelines are subject to change as the COVID-19 situation continues to evolve.  All requests should be funneled to the appropriate dean, vice provost or vice president via their respective leadership teams and management structures.

    Guidance for making internal meeting decisions (click to enlarge):

    Purdue Meeting Decision Tree

  • What is the guidance for anyone planning to host an international visitor or a conference, seminar or other event with international visitors?

    All university-sponsored events involving external visitors are canceled through June 30.

    Further, in addition to the suspension of all campus events with 50 or more people, at the direction of the president and provost, the university will not extend invitations to or host visitors from countries with CDC travel advisories at level 2 or above due to coronavirus. This applies to the Purdue West Lafayette, Purdue Fort Wayne, Purdue Northwest and all Purdue Research Park locations. 

    Our department has planned a seminar, speaker, conference or other event that will be taking place at Purdue. Will international travelers be able to attend from countries the CDC has listed as level 2 and level 3 risks for coronavirus? If not, can we reimburse them for their lost travel?

    Travelers coming from countries the CDC has listed as level 2 and level 3 risks for coronavirus will not be permitted to attend. You will be able to reimburse them for their travel if Purdue was funding the travel initially for the program.

    If paid for on a personal card, an attempt should be made to request refunds, transfer tickets or otherwise minimize financial impact. All remaining expenses should be submitted using standard reimbursement processes.

    If paid for on a grant, and you cannot receive a refund or a credit, this expense will need to be moved off of the grant or approval needs to be requested from the funding agency. We recommend that you work with your Post Award Office administrator in Sponsored Program Services to see what alternatives are available for revising or extending the grant to allow travel in the future.

    Our department has a seminar, speaker, conference or other event that will be taking place at Purdue in the next month. Can we cancel the conference and be reimbursed for payments made to external entities?

    An attempt should be made to request refunds, transfer tickets or otherwise minimize financial impact. All remaining expenses should be submitted using standard reimbursement processes.

    If paid for on a grant, and you cannot receive a refund or a credit this expense will need to be moved off of the grantor approval needs to be requested from the funding agency. We recommend that you work with your Post Award Office administrator in Sponsored Program Services to see what alternatives are available for revising or extending the grant to allow travel in the future.

  • Will conferences and events occur this summer? (Updated May 18)
    • All May, June and July conferences and events on campus are canceled.
    • Athletics will continue to follow campus, NCAA and Big Ten guidance.

Visitors | Events and meetings | University Planning | Health, Wellness and Prevention


University Planning

  • What measures is Purdue taking in preparation for a safe return to campus activity? (Added June 12)

    The Protect Purdue Plan is the University’s comprehensive and evolving plan to keep our campus and our community healthy and safe by limiting the spread of COVID-19.

    Read the details of the Protect Purdue Plan here.

  • Who is making decisions on campus safety and health issues? (Updated May 7)

    When a public health emergency emerges, the Public Health Emergency Planning team provides planning and response as needed. The group is co-chaired by the director, PUSH and the senior director, Environmental Health and Public Safety, and includes members of various campus departments as well as the Tippecanoe County Health Department.

    The university’s Integrated Emergency Management Plan guides preparedness for a number of specific emergencies, and includes guidance for public health emergencies.

    We look to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. State Department for recommendations and travel advisories.

  • What is the current CDC guidance for universities?

    This page offers guidance for institutes of higher education regarding administration, cleaning and travel.

  • How do I connect to the Purdue VPN from off-campus?
    Instructions for connecting to the Purdue VPN can be viewed here: https://www.itap.purdue.edu/connections/vpn/
  • What are the guidelines for designating and assigning “essential personnel”?

    In the event of a public health emergency or other crisis that requires access to the University to be severely limited, there are certain people who must report to campus to perform duties vital to the continuity of the University.  Additionally, there will be other essential staff performing critical functions who can perform these duties from a remote location such as home.

    Essential functions are those that need to be fulfilled when normal University operations have been suspended or closed. Departments must evaluate their department’s impact on the overall goal of maintaining essential University operations. Additionally, for continuity, they must designate these essential functions in advance. Pre-designation is especially important in incidents that happen with little notice. Individuals who directly support these functions are expected to report for work during the emergency period as requested by their department unless specifically directed by the department not to do so. The following information provides some general guidelines to be considered when designating the essential function positions.

    Essential/Critical functions or responsibilities are activities:

    • to preserve the health, well-being and safety of the Purdue campus community,
    • to assist and support students and others who must remain on campus with needs generated by the emergency,
    • to ensure timely and effective communication before, during, and after the emergency,
    • to provide utilities to maintain and protect campus buildings,
    • to maintain the health and well-being of animals,
    • to preserve the campus cyber infrastructure,
    • to preserve the core functions of the university (i.e. payroll, benefits, finance); and
    • to protect assets required to allow the University to resume its normal functions when the emergency /public health emergency has subsided; and
    • to preserve university facilities, including essential maintenance and repair

    These assets may include, but are not limited to:

    • cultures of valuable, unique, or irreplaceable living species,
    • valuable, unique, or irreplaceable research specimens or samples,
    • the environment surrounding and sustaining sensitive materials,
    • facilities and equipment,
    • sensitive or irreplaceable data, or
    • critical business continuation functions.

    Personnel designated by a unit head as “essential personnel” are employees who are needed in order to provide the minimum level of service in the department (i.e., human resources, finance, emergency services, utilities and provision of food and housing) and those needed to prevent irreparable damage to research and mechanical systems and those needed to maintain core functions of the university. Each affected unit head will designate Essential Personnel in his or her college or unit and notify them of their role and responsibility.

    Examples of staff members who are expected to be defined as critical or essential:

     

    Employee

    Duties

    Police officers and fire fighters

    Respond to emergencies, maintain order

    Certain power plant and utilities staff

    Maintain utilities

    Certain operations and maintenance staff

    Monitor facilities, repair serious problems

    Certain grounds staff

    Refuse removal, assist in equipment supply

    Certain computer staff

    Maintain infrastructure, support emergency operations

    Certain building services staff

    Refuse removal, cleaning of occupied areas

    Certain senior university staff

    Make decisions

    Certain business office staff

    Process emergency payments and payroll

    Certain human resources staff

    Process payroll, benefits, employee relations

    Certain animal caretakers

    Feed and monitor animals

    Certain health care staff

    Triage, treat students and staff, dispense medication

    Certain housing and food staff

    Feed and house students, staff

    Certain veterinary medicine staff

    Care of injured/sick animals

    Certain ADDL staff

    Provide diagnostic services

    Certain communications staff

    Disseminate information, policies

    Certain student services staff

    Assist students remaining on campus; continue recruitment, admissions processes

    The above list is by no means exhaustive but illustrates types of personnel considered as essential to report to campus or provide support from a remote location.  While the examples above illustrate the type of staff that are expected to be designated as essential, it will be a departmental decision to determine these in advance or as we progress into the crisis. 

    Additionally, essential staff may change depending on factors such as the time during the year, severity of the public health emergency, and the length of time suspension of classes or normal operations is in force.  The number of essential support staff, such as building services personnel will be highly dependent on the number of other students and staff who are on campus.  

    Prior to or at the declaration of a public health emergency period, Executive Vice Presidents, Vice Presidents, Vice Provosts, Deans, Directors, and Department Heads should review the designation of essential staff and the expectations for all employees during this period. 

  • Does the guidance on this site apply to the regional campuses (PNW and PFW)?
    Unless otherwise noted, the guidance on this page applies only to the Purdue West Lafayette campus. Regional campus leadership will provide guidance and answers specific to their campus communities. 

    This page provides guidance for Purdue Northwest. 

    This page provides guidance for Purdue Fort Wayne.  

Visitors | Events and meetings | University Planning | Health, Wellness and Prevention


Health, Wellness and Prevention

  • When must I wear a face mask? How will this requirement be enforced? (Added June 12)

    On May 26, 2020, the Purdue University Board of Trustees ratified a university regulation requiring wearing a face mask upon entering a campus building. The science on facial coverings has become clear in terms of limiting spread of COVID-19. Face masks help protect others from unintentional exposure from the person wearing it. Each of us has an obligation to protect against the spread of COVID-19.

    Compliance is expected in support of the Protect Purdue Pledge. As with other university regulations, failure to comply may result in disciplinary action through the Office of the Provost (faculty), Human Resources (staff) and the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities (students).

    Questions regarding exceptions to the regulation may be directed to those offices, which will then consult with other appropriate university offices/officials as necessary when evaluating requests for an exemption.

    Face masks do NOT replace personal protective equipment. If personal protective equipment is required, the appropriate personal protective equipment must continue to be worn as identified by the hazard assessment.

    If you are alone in your office or your lab, the regulation does not require you to wear a facial covering unless someone enters the space.

    You must wear a face mask if:

    • You are in a public or common space (hallways, conference rooms, restrooms, etc.) of any Purdue building.
    • You are in a classroom, laboratory or office with others.
    • You are outdoors and not able to maintain a safe social distance.

    You may remove your face mask if:

    • You are outdoors and able to maintain a safe social distance from others.
    • You are alone in your office or laboratory space.
  • I am a faculty or staff member who is particularly vulnerable to serious illness from COVID-19. What accommodations are available? (Added June 8)

    The Protect Purdue Implementation Team has announced the plan for identifying those who are most vulnerable to serious illness and the process for making accommodations to provide a safe working environment.

    More information is available here.

  • I live with someone who is medically vulnerable to serious illness. What should I do to help protect them? (Added June 17)

    The CDC recommends several practical things that you can do to protect vulnerable family members from your own work activities. These practices include the basics associated with practicing good social distance practices, wearing a face mask, frequent hand-washing, and avoiding public transportation. These and other practices can be found on the following CDC website: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/living-in-close-quarters.html.

  • I am concerned about working on campus because I live with someone who has a medical condition that puts them into a high-risk vulnerability category. What should I do? (Updated June 22)

    If any part of your work must be performed on campus and you have a family member living with you who is vulnerable to a serious illness, we encourage you to review this guidance and contact Human Resources to discuss ways to further protect yourself, including additional steps you can do at home to protect your family member.

    For additional information, check out the CDC website for additional considerations, including: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/deciding-to-go-out.html.

  • What should I do if I think I’ve been exposed to COVID-19? (Updated June 29)

    You can contact the Protect Purdue Health Center (PPHC) at 765-496-INFO (4636) or 833-571-1043 (toll free) to speak with a nurse who will ask questions and guide you through a COVID-19 screening to help determine if you have potentially been exposed and what your next plan of action needs to be, such as resuming normal stay-at-home activity/work, self-quarantining or seeking in-person health care.

    If you are advised to quarantine or seek additional health care, you will be provided a doctor’s note from the PPHC, which outlines your care and the number of days required to quarantine, etc.

  • How will campus be cleaned? (Updated June 10)
    • Building Services will perform expanded disinfection operations.
      • Touch point disinfection of campus 5x/week
      • Wide area disinfection of classrooms 5x/week
      • A day-time disinfection of high traffic restrooms in addition to the evening/night shift disinfecting to total 10x/week.
    • Priorities for Building Services staff will be as follows:
    1. Public safety/infrastructure protection (e.g. response to leaks and floods, snow removal at building entrances, etc.)
    2. Disinfecting critical areas
      1. Restrooms
      2. Common area high touch points (e.g. door handles)
      3. Classrooms
    3. Cleaning restrooms
    4. Cleaning classrooms
    5. Cleaning entrances and elevators
    6. Cleaning hallways and stairwells
    7. Cleaning offices, instructional laboratories and/or computer laboratories and conference areas
  • Will Purdue have the capability to test for COVID-19 on campus? (Added June 12)

    Yes. As part of our preparations for the fall semester, Purdue will establish a comprehensive internal testing and contact tracing system to rapidly assess, sample and test any student, faculty or staff member reporting COVID-19 symptoms and those identified through clinically relevant contact tracing. Testing protocols will be established in conjunction with CDC and ISDH guidelines.

    Building on existing testing capabilities at the Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab (ADDL) in the College of Veterinary Medicine, which has been CLIA certified to test human diseases, our protocols will include testing symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals following CDC guidelines with the goals of:

    • Protecting the most vulnerable.
    • Caring for symptomatic and sick individuals.
    • Managing the spread of the virus.

    Testing protocols may include the proactive testing of roommates, screening of our athletic teams, closely monitoring selected sites and surveillance testing throughout the semester.

    Additionally, we will build a mechanism for actively and accurately tracing the contacts of those who test positive for the virus, through a combination of in-person interviews and technology.

    Furthermore, Purdue will determine the most appropriate utilization of antibody (a/B) testing and its potential implementation on our campus.

  • What are the symptoms of COVID-19? (Updated April 28)

    The CDC provides a list of symptoms here. In confirmed COVID-19 cases, reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death. 

    According to the CDC, older adults and those with chronic medical conditions are at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19.

    You may also be interested in this COVID-19 self-checker from the CDC.

  • What if I test positive for COVID-19?

    All positive tests are reported to the CDC by the Department of Health or the laboratory processing the test. If you test positive for COVID-19, the County Health Department will trace your contacts and reach out as needed. Their tracing includes asking about the type of contact, the length of contact to assess risk level for the contact. To protect your personal health information, please do not email or call, or post on social media your test results.

  • Will Purdue implement contact tracing for those who test positive for COVID-19? (Added June 12)

    Yes. In tandem with our comprehensive onsite campus COVID-19 testing plan, Purdue will establish a mechanism for actively and accurately tracing the contacts of any faculty, staff or student who tests positive for the virus, through a combination of in-person interviews and technology.

    Read more about Purdue’s plans for a safe return to campus activity here.

  • When can I return to work if I have been diagnosed with COVID-19? (Added May 19)

    Employees may return to work when the following three conditions are met:

    • It must be a minimum of 10 days since symptom onset and
    • 3 days fever free without medication and
    • respiratory improvement

    The employee must supply a return to work medical release from their medical provider to their supervisor.

  • What is the CDC’s current recommendation on well individuals wearing cloth masks?

    The CDC says: We now know from recent studies that a significant portion of individuals with coronavirus lack symptoms (“asymptomatic”) and that even those who eventually develop symptoms (“pre-symptomatic”) can transmit the virus to others before showing symptoms. This means that the virus can spread between people interacting in close proximity—for example, speaking, coughing, or sneezing—even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms, and that is why social distancing of 6 feet apart is so important. In light of this new evidence, CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies) especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

    The CDC offers guidance on making and wearing cloth masks on these websites:

    These masks are not designed to function as OSHA approved personal protective equipment; rather they are an added deterrent to the spread of COVID19. Cloth masks do not replace the need to social distance and stay home if you are sick.

    If your duties require the wearing of personal protective equipment, you should continue to do so.

    Employees are permitted to provide their own cloth masks and wear them at work, as long as they follow the CDC recommendation for making, wearing and cleaning the cloth mask.

    The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators. Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

  • Should returning international travelers self-quarantine? (Updated June 29)

    In accordance with CDC guidelines, those who choose to travel internationally — regardless of whether the travel is sponsored by the university — must stay home and monitor their health for 14 days.

    In addition, all students and employees returning from outside the U.S. must self-quarantine for 14 days and watch for symptoms of COVID-19. Prior to returning to campus, contact the Protect Purdue Health Center at 765-496-INFO (4636) or 833-571-1043 (toll free) to obtain medical clearance to return to campus.

  • How do I self-quarantine? (Updated June 29)

    Anyone undergoing a self-quarantine should follow the CDC’s self-quarantine guidelines.

    For additional questions on monitoring your health, contact the Protect Purdue Health Center at 765-496-INFO (4636) or 833-571-1043 (toll free).

  • Does Purdue have a plan in place in the event of a campus or community outbreak of COVID-19? (Added June 12)

    Yes. The Protect Purdue Implementation Team is developing a range of contingency
    plans based on situations and circumstances that might occur and that may require the University to pause or shut down some or all activities.

    To prepare for this scenario, however likely or unlikely, Purdue is taking into careful consideration surrounding healthcare and treatment capabilities, on-campus testing capacities and back-up providers, and available isolation and quarantine capabilities on and around campus.

    Contingency planning is also taking into account what is happening in the surrounding community, and federal and state guidelines.

    Existing efforts, such as building resilient pedagogies that can adapt if a student must be isolated following a positive virus test, support our contingency planning.

    Read more about Purdue’s plan for a safe return to campus activity here.

  • I am having difficulty coping with the stress and uncertainty of changes brought about by COVID-19. What can I do? (Added June 22)

    Faculty and staff may seek confidential and professional mental health resources through Center for Healthy Living’s Employee Assistance Program

  • Why is the university requiring the flu vaccination? (Added May 27)

    Requirement of the influenza vaccine is among many substantial changes approved by Purdue’s Board of Trustees so that we can open our campus while protecting those most vulnerable in our community. Being vaccinated against seasonal flu helps the community avoid the risk of a seasonal flu pandemic and alleviates stress on the local and campus health systems while they are addressing the COVID-19 pandemic.

    As with current policy, we will allow exemptions for medical and religious purposes for the influenza vaccine. However, we expect all who intend to be part of the Purdue community to do their part and participate in this vital effort. The essential element that will allow us to continue to operate Purdue University will be the personal commitment from each member of the community to protect each other and themselves.

Visitors | Events and meetings | University Planning | Health, Wellness and Prevention